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View Full Version : What's the best kind of computer???



HopieBug
03-25-2011, 06:53 PM
i was just wondering this the other day... what's the best kind of computer??? i have this OLD Microsoft IBM Think Pad and my dad calls it a 'stink pad' cuz it takes forever to turn on!!!!! :D anyway, i think Apples are the best. my parents have one and it can do so much more than my 'stink pad'! ;)

Tromos
03-25-2011, 08:38 PM
The best computer is the one you build yourself.

stmomma
03-25-2011, 09:02 PM
I should try that, build my own that is. Suggestions for components and how to sites would be good. :) If I have to buy one again, it will definitely NOT be an HP.

kutlessrocker
03-25-2011, 10:56 PM
I've never built my own PC. The only thing I''ve ever had was Dell. I like them pretty good. I don't know what model the desktop I got from my grandma after she died is, but my laptop is an Insperon 1440.

HopieBug
03-26-2011, 09:31 AM
i think if i tried to make one, it would turn out to be an epic failure!!!!!!!!!!! :D

Tromos
03-26-2011, 09:17 PM
They really aren't that hard to build. And the sense of accomplishment when you finally flip the switch and it works is euphoric :)

HopieBug
03-27-2011, 08:57 AM
haha yeah i guess it is! i'd be like, "YESSSS!!!!!!!!" :D

John
03-27-2011, 12:35 PM
It really is gratifying to build your own computer. I've built three in the past two months and plan to do it soon as a business. I can build a PC with a good case, an AMD Phenom II dual core running at 3.2 ghz, 4 gigs DDR3 RAM, 500 gb hard drive, integrated graphics with HDMI output, and a fully licensed copy of WIndows 7 for $375. Naturally I charge more than that but I figure that's a phenomenal price. Let me know if you have any questions about building your own.


And to answer your question, Hopiebug, it really just depends on what you need your computer to do. If you don't need the Mac name, then you can get a PC that can do all the things a Mac can do for a fraction of the cost.

HopieBug
03-27-2011, 03:43 PM
goodness... three! that seems like a lot to me, but i'm not a computer expert!!!!! :)

Tromos
03-28-2011, 02:30 PM
...integrated graphics...

Aye, and there's the rub. Suitable for the vast majority of uses and economical, but not quite that last little bit of perfection that the gamers or videographers strive for. Still, integrated graphics have come a long way and will suit the needs of even moderate gamers. The key is to have enough RAM to be able to spare some for the video chip.

Regardless, that's a really good rig for the price, John.

Personally, if I won the lottery and didn't have to have a good income to support the family, I'd either build computers or do small engine repair for a living. I could lose myself for days in work like that...

John
03-28-2011, 02:48 PM
I agree--integrated graphics are very suitable for the average user but won't cut it for web and software developers running multiple hi-res monitors, videographers, and gamers. I run two screens (one at 1440 x 900 and the other at 1920 x 1080) and definitely would kill an integrated graphics chip with the load I would put on it. My Radeon HD 4600, which only cost $65 and has 1 GB of RAM, handles multiple monitors and games very well and wouldn't cost too much more for a customer, as the mobo would be cheaper without the integrated graphics chip.

Band-aide
03-29-2011, 01:43 PM
Last month when my HP tablet fried itself and had to be repaired, I almost got a Dell laptop with a dedicated graphics card. I couldn't do it though.... Building one is a good option except that I'd likely put something in backwards or upside down and start a fire...

Tromos
03-29-2011, 10:30 PM
Build desktops, Kristi. Don't build laptops.

John
03-29-2011, 11:12 PM
Yup. You'll lose your butt if you ever attempt building a laptop.

stmomma
03-29-2011, 11:23 PM
She'll lose the whole house if she tries to build a desk top or a lappy. lol She's right about putting something in backwards. She might be a programming genius but she is directionally challenged.

Tromos
03-30-2011, 10:49 AM
Thankfully, most of the components have evolved to be direction specific. The motherboards have the external ports that stick out the back of the computer, so you can figure out that orientation or you can't do anything anyway. Memory sticks have notches in them that prevent insertion in anything but the right orientation. IDE-style cards are the same. The only potential dangers are with the processor itself. The processor die often has a little arrow on the corner that helps and/or the die won't fit into the motherboard if it is rotated wrong. The fan/heatsink on the processor can be a little trickier depending on whether or not you have to manually apply the thermal paste, but that's more a matter of leverage than orientation.

So, all told, quit making excuses Kristi.

JesusFreak97
04-14-2011, 04:39 PM
Ok I'm totally lost.

HopieBug
04-15-2011, 03:57 PM
i don't blame you.

John
04-17-2011, 06:41 PM
Thankfully, most of the components have evolved to be direction specific. The motherboards have the external ports that stick out the back of the computer, so you can figure out that orientation or you can't do anything anyway. Memory sticks have notches in them that prevent insertion in anything but the right orientation. IDE-style cards are the same. The only potential dangers are with the processor itself. The processor die often has a little arrow on the corner that helps and/or the die won't fit into the motherboard if it is rotated wrong. The fan/heatsink on the processor can be a little trickier depending on whether or not you have to manually apply the thermal paste, but that's more a matter of leverage than orientation.

So, all told, quit making excuses Kristi.
I agree. Computer building has evolved into something that the average person can approach after a little research. The main issues for novices now are the proper selection of components, ensuring proper CPU and motherboard pairing (you won't get far if you buy the wrong pair), and respect for electrostatic discharge, which can destroy hundreds of dollars worth of components (I've seen it happen). But as long as you buy correct components, handle them properly, and ensure that either you or the surface you're working on is properly grounded, you should be fine.